Employee Ghosting is a Real Thing…and It’s Our Fault (But here’s how to fix it)

Type the term “employee ghosting” into Google, and you’ll end up with 166,000 results, most of which take the angle that a phenomenon once reserved for the dating game has, somehow, snuck up on business and permeated our unsuspecting, open-plan offices like the stench of a rotting corpse.

In truth, employee ghosting has been going on for decades. It’s just been us that’s been doing it, and we never planned for the shoe to be on the other foot. However, it’s going to be okay. Cue Adele’s ‘Turning Tables’ and have a good cry because the first step to fixing the problem is acknowledging where the problem started. As HR professionals, we are reaping the harvest which our own seeds have sown, and it all comes down to one major element: Candidate Experience.

What went wrong

For years, employers have become spectres by ignoring the candidate experience and post-interview follow-up because the influx of qualified candidates outweighed the time and resources available to respond to every candidate. We held the balance of power in the job market, with high unemployment rates and generic processes which acted as the enabling force to leave potential employees hearing crickets but too afraid to jeopardize their chances by reaching out and touching base.

In 2018, we find ourselves in a job-seekers market. Unemployment rates are the lowest they’ve been in nearly two decades. The tides have shifted, and employee ghosting is a new reality that requires adaptation if we’re going to be able to deal with it successfully.

What to do now

The best thing employers can do to detect and prevent it is by establishing a connection early and fostering engagement and trust throughout the hiring process. In other words, provide an experience that makes a candidate think they aren’t just a number, but a human soul, full of worth and skill who has the potential to tie into your culture and drive it to a level you only dreamed it would reach.

It may seem like I’m waxing poetic here, but that’s exactly what employees want to feel about their potential in your company—the very place where they will spend most of their physical and mental energy every week. That is HR Humanity in action, and if we’re not designing programs and processes that support it, we are sorely missing the mark.

Candidate experience is important because it ties closely into an employer’s brand—and by extension—their culture. Good connections may not prevent the reputation-risking move of ghosting outright, but we know that if candidates feel there is an existing relationship they are more obligated to reach out and at least make a respectful exit, which allows us to move to Plan B.

We’re drastically missing depth in nearly every touchpoint a candidate has with us. Even the most basic candidate relationship systems can be personalized in a way which allows for successful transfer of an employer brand and offers an opportunity for truly uninterested candidates to deselect themselves from the process early. We use a nearly automated system that allows candidates to move through the process quickly, and by the time they reach an interview they’ve gone through a series of written, audial and visual touchpoints with us which has allowed them to provide their unique view for what they bring to the table, and reconcile it with our culture and working reality.

We’re interested in listening to what candidates have to say, as well as how and why they say it, and I can tell you the payback in loyalty and trust far outweighs the effort it took to develop a reliable system in the first place. Deepening the candidate experience strengthens the public face of your brand as an employer, is easy to modify as needs in the market change.

Measuring it

So, how do you know if an experience is working? There are so many metrics and ways of gathering data that not having the information is no longer an excuse. Whether you are using employee net promoter scores, or open surveys, social media chatter or just not having success filling a role, there is always a backstory that exists, not to be a burden, but to help you read between the lines and fix what’s broken. The candidate experience is a living thing; an ongoing involvement that morphs into a main indicator of engagement once a joins your team—and we are all responsible for how we turn this “new normal” into the opportunity to create a more inclusive, respectful and human hiring experience.

As we move into another Halloween let’s not shrink back as the ghosts of our old mistakes haunts us, but infuse it with the humanity it—and all future candidates deserve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Onboarding Failures That Are Costing You Big

Finding (and keeping) great employees is consistently listed as a top concern of business owners. In fact, a recent study indicates anywhere between 10-25% of new employees jump ship within their first six months on the job. That’s a frustrating and expensive prospect on both sides of the coin, and one which could be greatly reduced with a change to some of the most common employee onboarding mistakes made by companies trying to integrate a new team member. Below are three of the worst barriers to successful onboarding—and some suggestions to combat them.

Problem #1: The Expectation Gap

According to executives interviewed, the top reason new employees leave is that their role wasn’t what they expected when they got hired. Many employees quickly discover that the daily tasks they’re asked to complete don’t tend to match what’s on their job descriptions and fall under the all too overused caveat of “other tasks as assigned.” Employees who find themselves consistently performing unexpected tasks find it difficult to link those tasks to the overall mission of the organization and discontent finds easy purchase in that soil. Fortunately, this is one of the easiest issues to rectify—and it can (and should) be fixed long before an employee’s first day.

The Solution

Dealing with the expectation gap is easily avoided by communicating a realistic job preview from the moment the job advertisement is posted. If you are aware that the job overview contains elements which may exist in a job description but are never used in practice, then they shouldn’t be included in an ad. If you have a position which sees a lot of turnover which doesn’t have to do with the nature of the job (for example, being a “feeder” job or a stepping stone by design to allow movement to other roles in the organization), then it may be time to review the job profile to see where there is a gap between expectation and reality. The best place to reinforce the picture of what day-to-day life will be like in the role is during the interview. This provides ample information for the candidate to consider the true nature of the job before accepting, allows the opportunity to ask questions and provides the added value of being able to view their body language for clues as to what they truly feel.

Problem #2: A Lack of Preparation

How many times has a new employee shown up for their first day while someone, somewhere, is scrambling to set up computer access, provide access to work areas, create an email address or telephone extension—in some cases, even finding an empty desk to work at? When an employer is unprepared for a new hire, it sends the signal loud and clear that the employee is not a valued addition to the team and makes it incredibly difficult to integrate into the culture.

The Solution

People are only able to work at their best when they are given the right tools. A simple checklist which can be accessed by any team member responsible for setting up the new hire is a great way to complete tasks before the first day and eliminate confusion over who is responsible for what. (At SalesUp! We use Trello, which is perfect for this type of task.) If setting up a workstation requires the purchase of new equipment, involving the employee over any requirements for specific equipment (such as left/right-handed implements, or any accommodations which may not have surfaced to this point) will make the employee feel invested from the get-go, and that investment pays off when it comes time for employees to decide whether they are going to stick with a job.

Problem #3: Overwhelm and Abandonment

Starting a new job is incredibly overwhelming. From navigating office hallways to matching faces and names to interacting with customers and filling out reams of paperwork, it’s a challenging time which can result in natural second-thoughts from employees if they don’t feel they have the support to be useful members of the organization.

To be clear, alone-time is good—even essential to let employees settle into their space—but leaving them with hoards of policy manuals and no one to help answer their questions is not. To combat this, ensure that new employees have a mentor to help them through the challenging early weeks, and tap into existing employee strengths to match them with the right people. Have someone who is an extrovert and great at ice-breaking? Have them handle team introductions. Has someone in the organization performed the employee’s role? Consider a short mentorship, or at the least have them check-in and see how things are going during the first critical weeks. Of course, this doesn’t negate the value of having manager support, but peer-mentorships can go a long way to solidifying the sense of belonging that is critical to cultural development. They don’t call onboarding “organizational socialization” for nothing…

The Take Home

Prepare. Prepare. Prepare. Have a formalized process (and if you don’t, make one). It can be difficult to allot resources to creating processes when you aren’t in a hiring position, but adequate foresight can eliminate so many onboarding issues before the scramble of having to find a new employee.

If you need ideas on how to best handle an onboarding solution that is customized to your organization, contact us – we’d love to help.

Best of all – if you have any tips or best practices, let us know in the comments below!

 

 

The One Recruitment Mistake You’re Probably Making (And How to Fix It)

It’s been said that “Variety is the spice of life”. In business, this is true on a number of fronts, from investment to technology—but never does it ring truer than in the people we choose to surround ourselves with via our recruitment process.

Unfortunately, in the process of hiring, many business owners are inadvertently surrounding themselves with the wrong people which are halting business growth.

I’m speaking of course of the Halo effect—an effect so subtle, we may not even realize it’s taken hold—until we’ve made an expensive hiring mistake, that is.

In its simplest form, the Halo Effect occurs when we assume that because someone excels at (A), they will also be good at (B), and (C). During the selection process, our subconscious is making assumptions about a candidate that can be unduly influenced by the interactions we have. Take for example a hiring manager, who discovers they enjoy the same hobby as a candidate during interview pre-amble. Because, the hiring manager holds positive pre-conceived notions about that particular hobby, it influences how that candidate is assessed during all other aspects of the selection process, sometimes providing false positives where there are none. That hiring manager is being blinded by the glow of the halo, so to speak.

The halo effect can extend from any number of factors which hold a personal pre-conception for a hiring manager. The danger with the halo effect is not only that you may end up with the wrong candidate in the position, but you may end up hiring too many like-minded individuals, which can perpetuate the status quo and deprive your organization of the critical variety of personalities and thinking styles which are critical for business growth.

Luckily there are several easy-to-implement tools you can utilize to neutralize the halo effect, and we’ve rounded out the top five:

  1. Conduct a Preliminary Phase

Especially for small and medium-sized businesses who are time-crunched and resource deficient, traditional recruitment tends to follow some variation of the following: Place Ad, Review Applications, Conduct Interviews, Check References, Hire. The problem with this system is that often the first and only time you have personal contact with the candidate is during the interview process. To develop a whole candidate approach, consider developing a preliminary phase, whether that be a pre-screen phone interview, a specific set of tasks an applicant must complete to make it to the next round. The benefit of a preliminary phase is that it forces you to review different aspects of their abilities before a face-to-face meeting, which allows you to focus on the candidate’s overall abilities.

  1. Turn Your Thinking Upside Down

This one requires a bit of a shift in thinking, but if you meet a candidate who gives you an overall great impression, approach the interview with the mindset that you want them to prove that the impression matches the ability. Conversely, if the first impression is just lukewarm, adopt the mindset that you are committed to providing the benefit of the doubt. As you ask the same questions to each candidate you will find that your results tend to come out much more objective than getting carried away by emotion no matter what the first-impression.

  1. Adopt an Objective Scoring System

I cannot stress enough how much of a difference this will make to your organization. Asking the same main questions to each candidate and having an objective scoring system (like a five-point scale) rather than simply recording of their answers with a yes/no approach forces you to isolate the intent of the question, and focus on content rather than form.

At the end of the interview you will clearly see patterns that distinguish possible strengths from possible challenges, which brings us to the next point:

  1. Use Science to Your Advantage

The use of a personality assessment, job fit questionnaire or other metrical assessment will support the results of your interview impressions, and provide you the critical data about personality quirks that will either mesh with or create problems within your team. The more you practice this, the more you will discover that the scientific data will almost always uphold the interview impressions, with the added dynamic of assessing fit—which is a huge predictor of job success.

  1. Wait

Prevailing science says it takes approximately 30 seconds to form an impression, but that impression could change with a little time. With the rush of back to back interviews and short timelines to decide, we tend to rush our perceptions about candidates which otherwise might have become clearer with a little hindsight. Try to schedule some dedicated time after interviews to do at least 30 minutes of another activity before reviewing the candidates, which will provide enough space for a more objective recruitment result.

The Bottom Line

While these aren’t huge changes to implement, refining your recruitment process to eliminate bias, and the dreaded Halo Effect (whether conscious or not) will result in the selection of some more well-rounded candidates who can offer the essential variety of human capital your organization needs. In addition, you’ll likely find it will boost overall success and retention rates because after all, hiring is a two-way street. The time spent getting to know your candidates in the right way will  also allow potential employees to get a realistic feel for your business, which leads to both parties forming an informed relationship right out of the gate.

How about you? What strategies do you use that remove bias from your recrtuiment process?

4 Tips For Hiring Great People

Business Owners often say: It’s so hard to find good people…

Good People say: “It’s so hard to find good jobs”. So, where’s the disconnect coming from?

Just like your ideal customers are looking for companies that can help them solve their problems, your ideal job candidates are looking for the same thing. Only their problem is not about buying it’s about finding a great company to work for.

When thinking about hiring, always think in ideals. And I don’t say this because I live in fairy tale land but because thinking about ideals helps you to dream about what is possible. For something to be created, first, you have to be able to see it in your mind. In the case of hiring, get clear on the ideal candidate. Who is the absolutely perfect person for the role you want to fill?

Once you are clear on that person, now ask yourself – “what sort of company would that person be drawn to work for”. This can be hard to do because you need to put yourself in their shoes, not yours. There are going to be logical things like good pay, job security, close by etc – but I want you to think of the less tangible things such as the four below.

What is the quality of: Your Business, Your Vision, Your Culture, Your Leadership?

By quality of business I mean is there some level of professionalism and organisation or are you in chaos. Do you have some good customers and clarity on how you want to get more or are you dealing with deadbeats and whiners? Do you have some systems that ensure consistency or are you and your team winging it?

The quality of your vision is – do you know where you (the business) is going. Can you see it, does it excite and inspire you. If you are not excited and inspired, you can’t expect others to be.

The quality of your culture might be self-explanatory but it is about what it’s like to work in your business. How does your team interact and behave? Is it positive, challenging and supportive – or are complaining and gossip present … or perhaps somewhere in between.

Lastly, the quality of your leadership refers to how you view your people. How much do you care about them? How much do you invest in helping them grow? Leadership is a massive topic so we won’t aspire to cover it here, but essentially ‘what’s it like to work for you?’

With all these things, you don’t need to be perfect but you do need to recognise that you will only get the quality of people that you’re ready for. You will attract a quality of person that matches the identity of your business. And the identity of your business is largely made up from the four categories outlined.

Attracting great people is a journey. See the quality of the people you are attracting as a marker of your progress toward building a great business. Keep at it and have fun.

Business Lessons From the Bike Trail #1 – Knowing Where to Focus

There’s a basic object to enjoying a safe ride on a mountain bike: Look where your going.

While the same can be said for business, it’s amazing how many people focus on the obstacles in front of them instead of focusing on the track, but when you fixate on the obstacles which are in your way – they tend to magnify – which makes your changes of hitting one fairly high.

The same goes for them you start riding faster on the trail. The faster you go (ie: the more you grow) the further down the track you need to look. Just don’t look so far down the track that you get blindsided from something you didn’t see just up ahead.

Have a think about your business. How far down the track are you looking? What obstacles do you face that you could find the answer to if you just ventured to look a little beyond them? Are you getting blindsided by other things that are stopping you from making progress?

The Secret to Managing Attitudes at Work

The number one stressors in business are (and may always be) money, and people. In fact, you likely know first hand how much emotional energy and loss of team synergy is wasted on a member of your team that just doesn’t fit the bill.

It turns out – the key to managing attitudes in the workplace is as simple as communication and follow-up. Sounds easy, right? Well it can be more difficult that you expect to implement, but once the expectations are set, it can become remarkably easy to keep momentum in your team.

The tools we need start with creating our core value and culture. You see, if expectations for every member of your organization aren’t clear, and we don’t hold people accountable, you will always have an organizational culture that is driven by the quality of people within it.

A good starting point is to check out “The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business“, by Patrick Lencioni it is a fantastic read about the concrete advantage that can be gained by having a healthy organization.

 

How To Know When It’s Time To Hire

When is the Right Time to Hire?

You may have noticed you’ve been getting busier, and it would be great to have an extra person or two to take some things off your plate. But what things? How many people? Before you throw money at the problem and hire another team member into your midst, you need to consider your systems and how they can be fine-tuned first.
  1. Consider the 80:20 principle: That 20% of your activities account for 80% of your results, so you are certainly going to want to concentrate on those items and pass a hat to someone else, so you can focus on growth. Have a look around at the resources you have first, to see if this delegation can be done internally. There are also many ways you can implement technology to help you do more with less.
  2. Determine if you can afford 60% of a new hire’s salary. In theory, the new hire will bring the remaining 40% of their salary to the table themselves through efficiency and capacity.
  3. Consider the burn rate. When hiring, you have to factor in 3-6 months of overhead costs while your new hire is getting up to speed enough to work at a higher level (and achieve financial results for your organization). Ensure you have enough to funds to cover this transition, and that you have the training to support their development.

A Better Alternative to New Years Resolutions

Most people acknowledge that New Year’s resolutions rarely work, so why do we keep making them? Is it a moment of drunken utopia that makes us believe that this year is going to be different?
The truth is, Jan 1st is just another day in the calendar. There is nothing magical about it. I know that sounds a bit deflating. Sure, it comes with the perception that you get a clean slate (and I’m all for taking advantage of that) but that is it. So why do we think a ‘resolution’ is going to work on Jan 1st vs. any other date on the calendar?
The reason most resolutions don’t work is because there is no emotional substance behind them. The plan to go to the gym and workout 4 times a week takes some serious dedication. Most people won’t do it because it requires a massive change in habits and the payoff is not entirely clear. The gym resolution is based more out of pain and fear (“I look like crap in front of a mirror”) vs passion and excitement.
My goal here is to give you a more concrete strategy to make your business and your life better
There are three things that must exist for a plan to be well executed. They are:
  1. Emotional leverage.
  2. Tools and skills.
  3. Visibility / Accountability.
(note: I’m now talking about plans and not resolutions. And the first ingredient to make a plan work is to actually have a plan ????. I’m not going to be talking about how to create your plan here. For more on that topic read my post creating 90-day plans or the importance of planning)
Emotional Leverage – is the ‘why’ behind your plan.
Why do you want it?
What is it going to do for you?
How important is that to you?
Your answers to these questions must add up and offset the level of difficulty in sticking to your plan. In other words if you are not really clear on the payoff, you are likely to quit or fall off the plan as you come up against obstacles. If the pain of not achieving your goal is less than the pleasure from hitting your goal … you’ll quit every time.
The way I do this, is I get my wife and kids involved in setting our family goals. Then together we work to build our vision board (a board with pictures representing the things we want to ‘be’, ‘do’ and ‘have’). These are both individual and family based. One of the ‘have’ items on our vision board right now is a pool in our backyard. And every other night or so, as we are putting the kids to bed, we role play how it would be to have the pool, like it is already there. During this process we get a feeling that builds within us. It’s an excitement and it give me fuel during the day when I’m going about executing my plan. Believe me, having your kids asking daily “how’s the pool coming along Dad?” is potent fuel for action.
Does it work. Hell yes. I’m using it right now. For me, writing like I’m doing here, is one of those tasks that will easily fall on the procrastination pile. So to make it happen I think of my kids playing in the pool. It makes me move!
Tools and skills – when you are awesome at something, it is much more fun to do. Simply because it is easy. So to make executing on your plan easier, get better at the things on your plan. The more you invest in your own education and betterment, the easier life becomes. The question to answer is – “what 2 or 3 skills are going to be critical to this plan succeeding”. Then develop some methods for improving (reading books, practice, attending a course etc). Just think, if you invested in improving 1 or 2 skills every 90-days, how much could you improve over the course of a year? What about 5yrs? Oh yeh … this is where the gold really lies.
Visibility and Accountability – Even if you have strong emotional leverage and you have all the tools and skills you need to be successful, sometimes we just don’t make the best choices with our time. (i.e. we get distracted – it happened to me yesterday as I passed too close to a bike shop and I got sucked right in ???? ) and caught up in things that are not key to our progress.
My suggestion for you here is have your goals and key activities clearly posted where you can see them. I use my 90-day plan format and have it posted on my wall in my office. Our family vision board is where we eat every meal. It is all front and centre so it’s very hard to forget. I also take tasks from my 90-day plan and have them posted right in my calendar so I know exactly what I’m supposed to be working on and when. My last tool is one I call ‘The Sales Game’ and it is a points system based on certain activities I know need to be done to grow my business. It sits on my desk and is very obvious. It serves as a constant reminder as of what I should be working on.
Having someone you are accountable to also helps. You really should have others involved in your plan anyway so it becomes easy for others to see what should be getting done. I’m not a big fan of people checking in on me (I know when I’m behind, having people ask me just pisses me off). What works for me is making commitments to people. I really feel bad when I don’t keep my commitments. Know what form of accountability works for you and use it to your advantage. Want an app solution? Check out www.coachme.com
Some things to remember before you run off – executing on an idea is way harder than coming up with the idea. Sticking with a plan is way more important than having the perfect plan. Use these tools and strategies to truly make this your best year. I’d love to hear your success stories. Email me [email protected]

How to Hire Top Performing Sales People

If every there was a holy grail, this would be it. If only there was a way to consistently hire top performing sales people!!

Well I’d love to say I’ve got the silver bullet for you … but I think you’d know I’d be lying. What I have got though, are some juicy tips and tricks shared from recruiting veteran Kristen Harcourt. Kristen is a senior consultant with The McQuaig Institute. The McQuaig Institute are leaders in the field of profiling and assessments with respect to recruiting. While The McQuaig Institute can and do help companies assess a variety of roles, their grass roots and expertise is with sales people.

In this interview, Kristen shares with us the ‘tells’, tricks and tips on finding, filtering and identifying top performers. The whole interview is 37 minutes long and it is packed with gems to help you find the sales people you are looking for.

Enjoy the listen. Please share your thoughts and ideas on the content of the interview below, we’d love to hear your take.

And…if you want to take this podcast on the go and have a listen later, you can! Right click the link HERE and save it to your device.