Employee Ghosting is a Real Thing…and It’s Our Fault (But here’s how to fix it)

Type the term “employee ghosting” into Google, and you’ll end up with 166,000 results, most of which take the angle that a phenomenon once reserved for the dating game has, somehow, snuck up on business and permeated our unsuspecting, open-plan offices like the stench of a rotting corpse.

In truth, employee ghosting has been going on for decades. It’s just been us that’s been doing it, and we never planned for the shoe to be on the other foot. However, it’s going to be okay. Cue Adele’s ‘Turning Tables’ and have a good cry because the first step to fixing the problem is acknowledging where the problem started. As HR professionals, we are reaping the harvest which our own seeds have sown, and it all comes down to one major element: Candidate Experience.

What went wrong

For years, employers have become spectres by ignoring the candidate experience and post-interview follow-up because the influx of qualified candidates outweighed the time and resources available to respond to every candidate. We held the balance of power in the job market, with high unemployment rates and generic processes which acted as the enabling force to leave potential employees hearing crickets but too afraid to jeopardize their chances by reaching out and touching base.

In 2018, we find ourselves in a job-seekers market. Unemployment rates are the lowest they’ve been in nearly two decades. The tides have shifted, and employee ghosting is a new reality that requires adaptation if we’re going to be able to deal with it successfully.

What to do now

The best thing employers can do to detect and prevent it is by establishing a connection early and fostering engagement and trust throughout the hiring process. In other words, provide an experience that makes a candidate think they aren’t just a number, but a human soul, full of worth and skill who has the potential to tie into your culture and drive it to a level you only dreamed it would reach.

It may seem like I’m waxing poetic here, but that’s exactly what employees want to feel about their potential in your company—the very place where they will spend most of their physical and mental energy every week. That is HR Humanity in action, and if we’re not designing programs and processes that support it, we are sorely missing the mark.

Candidate experience is important because it ties closely into an employer’s brand—and by extension—their culture. Good connections may not prevent the reputation-risking move of ghosting outright, but we know that if candidates feel there is an existing relationship they are more obligated to reach out and at least make a respectful exit, which allows us to move to Plan B.

We’re drastically missing depth in nearly every touchpoint a candidate has with us. Even the most basic candidate relationship systems can be personalized in a way which allows for successful transfer of an employer brand and offers an opportunity for truly uninterested candidates to deselect themselves from the process early. We use a nearly automated system that allows candidates to move through the process quickly, and by the time they reach an interview they’ve gone through a series of written, audial and visual touchpoints with us which has allowed them to provide their unique view for what they bring to the table, and reconcile it with our culture and working reality.

We’re interested in listening to what candidates have to say, as well as how and why they say it, and I can tell you the payback in loyalty and trust far outweighs the effort it took to develop a reliable system in the first place. Deepening the candidate experience strengthens the public face of your brand as an employer, is easy to modify as needs in the market change.

Measuring it

So, how do you know if an experience is working? There are so many metrics and ways of gathering data that not having the information is no longer an excuse. Whether you are using employee net promoter scores, or open surveys, social media chatter or just not having success filling a role, there is always a backstory that exists, not to be a burden, but to help you read between the lines and fix what’s broken. The candidate experience is a living thing; an ongoing involvement that morphs into a main indicator of engagement once a joins your team—and we are all responsible for how we turn this “new normal” into the opportunity to create a more inclusive, respectful and human hiring experience.

As we move into another Halloween let’s not shrink back as the ghosts of our old mistakes haunts us, but infuse it with the humanity it—and all future candidates deserve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using Trello to Create Checklists You’l Actually Use

Systems, while not the answer to everything, can certainly be one of those things that brings a great sense of control to your business.

The trick is creating them in such a way that:
1. They work,
2. People use them,
3. You can keep them updated and relevant.

And doing those three is not always easy.

For us and many of our clients, we’ve been using Trello successfully to achieve all three points above. In this video, I walk you through how we are using and that may give you some ideas how it may work for you.

Don’t forget to download the Master Systems Checklist below – and if you need help designing systems that are unique to your business – give us a shout.

We welcome any comments or questions. Enjoy!

Cheers
Jamie

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How to Master the Inner and Outer Game of Business Growth

On September 30, Jamie was interviewed by Eric Dye of the Entrepreneur Podcast Network about dealing with growing pains and managing the internal and external challenges that come with growing a successful business.

With tips from our business coaching toolbox Jamie painlessly describes what specific characteristics and skillsets are needed for an entrepreneur to have successful business growth. Give it a listen:

TIP: Invest in you. Your business is a reflection of you. If you want to grow your business and stay one step a head, then you need to grow you. And to find the place to start, look to where your stress is. Stress is usually created by uncertainty, i.e. not knowing how to handle a certain problem. That might be the place you need to learn some more or become more capable in same way.

Listen to Jamie’s interview with Curtin FM for the skinny on the productiviy apps that can help you manage your time and harness business growth

Productivity Apps that Cut Through the Noise

Here is a recent interview Jamie did with Jenny Seaton of Curtin FM talking about the benefits of workplace productivity apps.

Emotion Can be a Business Asset

Time to Watch: 4:34

It’s important to know what your goal is and how you’re going to execute it, but sometimes one of the missing ingredients is having the emotional leverage or clarity around why you’re going for something and the drive to see it through. This clarity of emotion is a business strength your don’t want to ignore.

In the pursuit of any goal, there’s ups and downs, but it’s when things are challenging and going against you, that you need those emotional reserves. In this video I’m not going to walk you through the actual planning process—there’s a cracker of a guide HERE that teaches you how to do that—but rather, we’re going to go through some east steps to tap into those emotional reserves when you need them.

What you’ll need to complete this exercise is a blank piece of paper, divided into three columns and enter your information as follows:

  1. Write your goal in the middle column. The only guideline here is to make sure you are picking S.M.A.R.T. goals. That is, goals that are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Results-oriented with a Timeframe. SMART goals are critical in the planning process, particularly so you can gain a better picture of what success for that goal looks like in reality.
  2. In the left-hand column, write the all the “WHY” reasons which relate to the goal. Behind every goal is a feeling, an emotion – and the emotional result that you want to achieve through that goal. Don’t skip this step or shake this task as a feel-good, fluff piece which doesn’t have any basis—nothing could be further from the truth. What you want to distill here are all the emotional reasons you want to achieve the goal. For example – if the goal is financial and you want to pay down your mortgage faster, list the emotional benefits you will gain by doing so (more disposable income to travel, more time with family, helping your children financially—whatever it is that fuels your fire). It is the feelings you will get from achieving that goal that will sustain you in the low times.
  3. Finally, in the right-hand column is the “HOW.” Don’t worry about getting this column ‘right.’ The ‘how’ column is all about brainstorming. This is the place to list every possible way you can think of to achieve that goal (and you may need an extra page to do this—that’s ok!). Once you have an exhaustive list, you can go back, prioritize and figure out and ask yourself, “which ones make sense?”, “which ones do I have the resources/time/ability to do.” Etc…
  4. From there, we advocate that you develop a structure to execute the plan and to help solidify your tasks and timelines. To do this, feel free to access our free 90-Day Planning guide which has all the tools and resources to help you develop and track your plan.

That’s it! The absolute importance of planning with purpose and emotion can’t be understated. The clearer you get on your goals, the more emotional leverage you have behind you to help you achieve those goals you’ve been dreaming of.

Dream big!

P.S. You can access the jam-packed Planning Edition of our Business Nutrition Newsletter HERE.

And for more free training Videos, subscribe to our Youtube Channel.

How to Create a Profit Model

Time to Watch: 5:56 well-spent minutes

Do you have a current profit model? Have you ever wondered about which changes in your business will make the biggest impact on your bottom line? Is so, you’re not alone – and this is the right place to be to find out the answer. This video tells you, with real-world examples, how to determine the level of profit you’ll be able to realize through different changes to sales and growth patterns.

If you’re interested in some related training, see our video “How to Create a Profit First Budget”  for a step-by-step guide that goes into a bit more detail.

Look, I get numbers are not the most exciting part about business ownership, but they are one of the most important. To see what I mean, have a look at Vol. 28 of our Business Nutrition Newsletter which exclusively deals with putting yourself in a strong financial situation, so you can sleep at night.

If money is where you’re really struggling as a business owner,  read this and then do this.

Now go out there and get amongst it!

Cheers,

 

P.S. Don’t forget to stay in the loop with our latest rapid training videos on SalesUp!TV

How to Avoid Being “That Boss”

Time to Watch: 3:16

Whether you call yourself a Boss, Leader, or Owner, there’s a very fine line between setting the pace and driving the pace. Knowing the difference is critical to the health of your team. It’s easy to fall into the trap of “Boss think” on this one, and it can be detrimental to the health and productivity of your team. Here’s how to effectively set the pace as a leader, no matter what stage your business is at.

What we’re talking about here is your effect on the team in terms of your behaviour around implementation and execution. It can be easy to fall into the trap of thinking that you aren’t held to account in the same way that your people are, but to echo a sometimes-overused phrase, you really do need to lead by example to get the results you want.

You can’t create separate standards for yourself and your team, because the difference will be stark, and the result will be the creation of an “us vs. them” culture which does nothing to promote, ingenuity, motivation or retention—all cornerstones of a successful business.

If you’re looking to be a team and work as a team, then you need to actively participate as one of the team, regardless of how you view yourself in the culture of the business.

What are your biggest challenge jumping into the trenches? Let us know in the comments below.

And if you watch this and think: “If there’s no ‘I’ in team, why am I doing all the work?” This read is for you.

Get out there and have fun with it, and if you’ve hit a stumbling block, we can help. Reach out and let us know what you need.

Cheers,

 

Keep in the loop with our latest rapid training videos on SalesUp!TV

5 Ways to Make Better Business Decisions

When we started working with Adam he told us he didn’t have the time to measure stuff, let alone the time to compile and analyse the results.

Adam’s situation is typical of many small business owners.

While not all our clients say it to our face, we can see the anguish on their face when we start talking about metrics and reporting.

Here’s how we got Adam excited about numbers to the point where we had to put the brakes on him measuring too much.

We started by asking Adam, “What would you say to an athlete that was trying to run a record time but was not timing their efforts?”. Predictably he said he’d tell them they were crazy.

Next, we asked “How comfortable would you be flying on a plane whose pilot could not read the controls?” Again came a predictable response “Not very”.

“Or what about a doctor who prescribes medication without measuring any of your vitals like blood pressure, cholesterol, etc.” … Adam could see the theme.

Bringing it closer to home we asked “What about a business (not yours) that you invested your life savings into and the CEO didn’t know the profit margins on the work they were doing. They also didn’t understand the numbers behind their marketing so had no idea how to grow the business. How safe would you feel about your investment?” This one made Adam sit up a little straighter.

He knew where we were going, and we probably didn’t have to ask him the next question, but we wanted to drive the point home. You see Adam was not doing nearly as well as he wanted to—and on this point of measuring—he had his head in the sand.

Last question … “Adam, what’s the difference between all these examples and you and your business? If it’s important for all these other people to measure and read the results, what do you think might be good for you and your business?”

He got it.

There’s a business mantra “What gets measured gets managed”. And while we are huge proponents of this mantra, there’s another quote by Einstein that we also like. He says “Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts”. 

For small business owners, both of these quotes need to be taken into account. When you are short on time and possibly lacking easy access to data (although this is rapidly changing with cloud accounting and other apps), starting simple is the key.

Follow these four steps to gain some meaningful data which will enable you to start making better businesses decisions.

  1. Brainstorm a list of possible things to measure (here are some to get you started)
    • Marketing (lead sources, retention rate, website performance, referral rate, social media stats, campaign results, cost per lead, etc.)
    • Sales (conversion rates [dissected by lead source and salespeople], pipeline stats [how many fall off where], average quote value, average job value, margin, sales activities, discounts, new vs. existing customers)
    • Operations (major costs/sales, project completion duration, Work In Progress, quality stats, bottlenecks, scrap or waste)
    • People (turnover, absenteeism, survey responses, revenue/employee, etc.)
    • Financial – AR Days, AP Days, Inventory days, Gross Margins,
  2. Identify top 5 that will give you meaningful information for your business. Things to consider:
    • Which number, if measured, will make other numbers less important (e.g. an employee survey may give you way more insight vs. measuring absentee days, and it requires fewer resources to measure)?
    • Which numbers can we measure easily?
  3. Take the top 3 from this list and commit to measuring them for 90 days. If 3 is too hard, make it less. Your primary goal here is to develop the habit, make it easy to be successful and see the value from having some accurate numbers. Note: Allocate accountability for each number.
  4. At the end of 90 days, review what you’ve accomplished and do 1 – 3 of the following:
    • Amend what you are measuring – you may have found out that was not the best thing to being measuring
    • Add to what you’re measuring. Over time you’ll want to have a more robust scorecard than just 3 numbers. Gradually add to it as it makes sense.
    • Develop a wish list of other numbers to measure. Having numbers on your wish list lets you know they are not forgotten and can forgo the temptation to try to measure too many at once.
  5. Be sure to look at the numbers at least weekly. The more often you look at them, the more beneficial they will be. The exception here is, of course, numbers that require long periods of time to change, though these are usually few. Also be sure to display data in a format that is meaningful. (i.e. sometimes you need to see trends vs. stand-alone numbers.) For example. # quotes mean more when there is something to compare it too.

Building a Profit-First Budget

Budgeting is not something most business owners would list as one of their most exciting tasks – and that’s ok, but it is necessary, and there is a way to build a budget that makes profit non-negotiable. Here’s how you can create a budget which helps you think differently about how you manage the expense side of your business, and will radically change your profit results.

3 Immediate Strategies to Boost Profits

If you are not profitable, your business has a death date. At the very least it is a long trudging journey of survival as you go day to day hoping to have enough money in the bank to pay your bills. That is no way to live, and I’m sure it’s not why you started your business.

It’s time to make healthy profits non-negotiable! Here are three strategies you can implement immediately to boost profits:

  1. Raise your prices – and if you’re like most business owners, your mind is already throwing up the objections “we won’t be competitive,” “Our customers are price-sensitive,” “We’ll lose our customers, ” and the list goes on. Before you spend too much time buying into your sabotaging beliefs, consider the actual impact of pricing through this example:

If your Gross Margin is currently 30% and you discount prices by 10% to win business, you need to make 50% more in sales to still make the same amount of profit. Versus if you raise your prices by 10%, your sales can decrease by 25% and you will still make the same amount.

And which customers do you think you might lose when you increase your prices? Yes, the pain-in-the-ass customers. And in our experience, most of the time minimal loss in incurred. What you really end up with is more profit.

As a small business, you want to be premium and expensive. And be sure your product or service matches your price point through quality and differentiation. If you are the same or worse than your competition, then forget about pricing, work on making your offering better first.

  1. Build a profit-first budget. What this means is you develop a conservative business model that sets you up for success in being profitable. Most people plow ahead with rose coloured glasses and ‘hope it will all work ‘ That is not a good strategy.

Here are your four steps to creating a profit-first budget.

  1. Make a conservative forecast for your sales for the next 12 months
  2. Decide what level of profits you want. (i.e. 15%)
  3. Build in your Gross Margin. You should know this. Make it conservative
  4. Make your overhead fit in the amount left over.

E.G. Sales of $1,000,000, profit of 15%, Gross Margin of 30% = Overhead allowance of $150,000.

This methodology will make you take a hard look at expenses. Click here to view a short video that dives a bit deeper into this point

  1. Negotiate – all business arrangements should be set up with the intention of win/win. That doesn’t mean you should take the first price someone gives you. There are always ways to find a better deal. Perhaps negotiating payment terms or buying in larger Or of course shopping around.

The underlying principle behind boosting profits and making this strategy work is your own negotiating skills. Most people are inherently bad negotiators. It invokes fear in people to ask for a better deal. To help you with this read “Never Split The Difference” by Chris Voss. It’s a game changer.